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The key to effective delegation

To become an effective and successful leader, one must know the importance of delegation and focus on other areas that make a great difference for the success of the project. A delegation of tasks also helps to manage people effectively in a team. Delegation tasks not only frees a person to focus on their imperative assignments but also helps in the growth and development of other people in the team. When done correctly, it motivates the person to whom the tasks are delegated, which, as a result, contributes to their professional development.

Delegation involves:

  • Clear allocation of assignments and responsibilities.
  • Placing well-defined objectives and measures.
  • Supervising the process, progress, and outcomes.

Here are some of the points that one should keep the following in mind to delegate efficiently.

Prepare

The key to effective delegation is preparing groundwork, which requires careful planning and development of tasks that are being delegated. Designing a clear map of the required tasks will save time and provide clear objectives to the person who will perform those tasks. The purpose here is to be specific and identify responsibilities that need to be assigned, which requires clear communication of the tasks.

Pareto’s Principle 

The Pareto Principle, named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, or The 80/20 Rule, 

Effective managers do not delegate the 20 percent of tasks that affects 80 percent of results, but exactly the opposite. Delegating unimportant tasks such as administrative work that are neither sensitive nor high-risk can be a better option than handing over key tasks. Moreover, these tasks should be delegated based on one’s potential to ensure maximum productivity and effective results.

Challenge and motivate

When deciding whom to delegate certain tasks to, smart managers take many factors into consideration such as individual’s skill sets, nature of the assignment, opportunities for growth, among others. This requires having a good understanding of aptitudes and competencies of the team members.

Clear Explanation

Managers should provide a clear explanation of tasks and responsibility including the expected outcome to ascertain that the person to whom the work is delegated is able to understand the work and is able to complete it in an effective manner.

Take a personal interest in the progress of the delegated task

Managers should provide guidance for the resources that may be required to complete the task. Requesting regular update of tasks and willing to provide assistance, if required, is valuable. However, this should be done without being intrusive, which will give the impression of untrustworthiness to the team member. This can be done by keeping an environment of open communication.

Evaluate and reward

Evaluation of results is more crucial than methods. If the assignments were achieved competently by the team, they should be informed of their success. In case of insufficient performance, the manager should analyse and provide effective feedback.

With practice, the delegation process becomes faster and seamless. As mentioned previously, not only does it help in reducing managers from getting exhausted from work, but it also helps the team to grow together. Moreover, it provides the manager with an opportunity to identify the strengths of their team members.

It also boosts team morale and enthusiasm, enabling them to dive in the challenging projects together. The saying “if you want the job done right, you should do it yourself” is no more applicable in today’s highly competitive and task-oriented era. A better approach is to “delegate effectively if you want a job well done.”

Developing Mental Strength

We all have ups and downs in life and experience some really tough times. How we handle these times is a sure sign of mental strength. Avoiding emotional times and difficult situations will not serve as well and will make you vulnerable to when the tough times come.

I remember as a young police officer dealing with death, violence and witnessing incidents that simply stay with you. I developed my own mental strength on the go. It helped me years later experiencing family bereavements and stresses in the workplace. I explore how to develop mental strength

What is mental strength?

Mental strength means that you regulate your emotions, manage your thoughts, and behave in a positive manner, despite your circumstances.

Picture a mentally strong person. Whether you imagine a real person or just think about the characteristics of a strong person, you are most likely thinking about qualities like resilience and perseverance.

This is exactly what mental strength is all about – the ability to remain calm and composed under pressure.

When a disaster strikes, mental strength helps you look beyond the disappointment and tears, quickly helping you to move forward.

Mental strength means you aren’t stifled still in the face of adversity.

You can think of mental strength as your companion. That one friend who sticks by you in good and bad times telling you to keep moving and pushing forward. It’s the inner voice of respect, trust and confidence.

Stop Negative Thoughts

Although most of us don’t spend time thinking about our thoughts, increasing your awareness of your thinking habits proves useful in building resilience. Exaggerated, negative thoughts, such as, “I can’t ever do anything right,” hold you back from reaching your full potential. Catch your negative thoughts before they spiral out of control and influence your behavior.

Identify and replace overly negative thoughts with thoughts that are more productive. Productive thoughts don’t need to be extremely positive, but should be realistic. A more balanced thought may be, “I have some weaknesses, but I also have plenty of strengths.” Changing your thoughts requires constant monitoring, but the process can be instrumental in helping you become your best self.

Increase Emotional Intelligence

Allowing your emotions to control your life will deplete your mental strength. While there’s nothing wrong with being in a bad mood sometimes, staying stuck in a negative rut can be a slippery slope:

A lot of problems stem from our desire to avoid discomfort. For example, people who fear failure often avoid new challenges in an effort to keep anxiety at bay. Avoiding emotional discomfort, however, is usually a short-term solution that leads to long-term problems.

Develop an awareness of how your emotions impact your life. Decide that you’re going to be in control of your emotions so they don’t control you. Face uncomfortable feelings head-on and take charge of your life. The more you practice tolerating discomfort, the more confidence you’ll gain in your ability to accept new challenges.

Don’t be a Martar

We tend to think that mentally strong people “power through it all” by avoiding rest and working 24/7.

Over the long-term, the exact opposite holds true.

“Resilience is how you recharge, not how you endure.”

Shawn Achor

Staying up late and avoiding relaxation has an incredibly negative effect on your brain power. You’re at increased risk for succumbing to impulsive desires, inattentiveness and questionable decision-making, amongst other effects.

To gain mental strength, know when to put down your phone or turn off your laptop, and prioritize the much-needed recuperation of your body and mind.

You have to learn to work with your thoughts, manage your emotions, and behave productively despite the circumstances. Over time with regular practice, attention, and focus, your brain will actually physically rewire itself, through a process called neuroplasticity, so that stronger and healthier becomes the default. Increasing your mental strength is the key to reaching your greatest potential in life.

 “Surround yourself with only people who are going to lift you higher,” said Oprah Winfrey.

Striving to expand your network with inspirational people is a great stepping stone for improving your mental strength.

The Way Forward

You have to learn to work with your thoughts, manage your emotions, and behave productively despite the circumstances. Over time with regular practice, attention, and focus, your brain will actually physically rewire itself, through a process called neuroplasticity, so that stronger and healthier becomes the default. Increasing your mental strength is the key to reaching your greatest potential in life.

The 5 Essential Components of Emotional Intelligence That Will Help You Achieve

Emotional Intelligence is how somebody manages their personality to be both personally and interpersonally effective. It’s their ability to identify, assess and control one’s own emotions, the emotion of others and that of groups

It’s the difference between a leader or a manager a people person or a task driven person. My experience shows that when you lack this essential skill you can demotivate and can be less effective at what you do.

People with a high degree of emotional intelligence know what they’re feeling, what their emotions mean, and how these emotions can affect other people.

According to Daniel Goleman, an American psychologist who helped to popularize emotional intelligence, there are five key elements to it

  • Self-awareness.
  • Self-regulation.
  •  Motivation.
  • Empathy.
  • Social skills.

Daniel Goleman’s 1995 book ‘Emotional Intelligence’ introduced a whole new perspective on predicting and analysing employee performance. The author, one of the world’s leading EQ academics, suggested that there is far more to being successful than high levels of cognitive intelligence.

Goleman suggested ‘emotional intelligence’, a term developed by Salovey and Mayer (1989), is twice as important as cognitive intelligence for predicting career success and there was currently far too much emphasis on traditional predictors of employee performance.

High levels of emotional intelligence improve working relationships, help to develop problem solving skills, increase efficiency and effectiveness and catalyse the development of new strategies.

Goleman defines it as “the ability to identify, assess and control one’s own emotions, the emotion of others and that of groups.”

The Facts Regarding Emotional Intelligence

Neurological evidence shows that thoughts and feelings do not occur randomly. They are responses to a stimulus which has been perceived, interpreted and filtered through one’s underlying attitudes. It is a person’s attitude that largely influences their feelings, thoughts and in turn behaviours. Consequently, Emotional Intelligence is fundamentally influenced by the attitudes you 

Five Key Components to Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence article

1.Self-Awareness

Practically this means recognizing you’re the changes of emotional state. When for example a person says something to you that really annoys you. Emotional intelligence people will be aware that for example their heart is pumping faster. That feeling in the pit of there stomach is there and finally that they now select how they react to the situation. Importantly for me is the fact that those rich in Emotional Intelligence choose how they react, they are under full control.

As a young police officer and later in business self-awareness allowed me to adopt a different attitude to everyday and extreme situation helping to result in positive outcomes.

Self-awareness has huge benefits, including the ability to notice problems arise so that you can handle them swiftly– before they get bigger– to the ability to see things from a clearer perspective, making your response to emotions healthier.

Individuals with high levels of emotional intelligence our comfortable with there own thoughts and emotions and understand how they impact on others. Understanding and accepting the way you feel is often the first step to overcoming.

People who possess good self-awareness tend to confident in themselves and their abilities, and are aware of how other people perceive them.

Self-awareness in Emotional Intelligence
  • Emotional awareness: recognizing one’s emotions and their effects.
  • Accurate self-assessment: knowing one’s strengths and limits.
  • Self-confidence: sureness about one’s self-worth and capabilities.

Self-regulation

Self-regulation is all about expressing your emotions appropriately. It is also important to be able to control and manage your impulses and emotions. Strong self-regulation skills are high in conscientiousness high in EI means that you will thoughtful of how you influence others and take responsibility for your own actions.

Slamming the phone down and cursing in front of your team for example shows lack of self-regulation and that you have failed to recognise the effect of your behaviour on your team.

Acting rashly or without caution can lead to mistakes being made and can often damage relationships with clients or colleagues?

Its important to note that managing your emotions is not about bottling things up. This will only lead to a huge outburst or stress as you’re feeling mount up. Self-regulation requires that simply means waiting for the right time, place, and avenue to express your emotions.

Those who are skilled in self-regulation tend to be flexible and adapt well to change. They are also good at managing conflict and diffusing tense or difficult situations.

Goleman also suggests that those with strong self-regulation skills are high in conscientiousness. They are thoughtful of how they influence others and take responsibility for their own actions.

Self Control in Emotional Intelligence
  • Self-control: managing disruptive emotions and impulses.
  • Trustworthiness: maintaining standards of honesty and integrity.
  • Conscientiousness: taking responsibility for personal performance.
  • Adaptability: flexibility in handling change.
  • Innovativeness: being comfortable with and open to novel ideas and new information

Emotional Intelligence Motivation

Self-Motivation

We all react well to positive people with a passion and its no exception when it comes to leadership. Having motivation as a leader means that you are probably responding to a vision or gaol. Emotional intelligent people passion for work will go beyond money or status. In their hearts they may want to create a better world or impact on individuals so that they better themselves.

I see these traits in people I coach they possess a strong desire to achieve and to optimise their performance. People who have these motivational skills can face failure by bouncing back and finding a new and better way to proceed. People with this sort of mental ability tend to be resilient and make great leaders.

A passion for what you do is far better for your emotional intelligence. This leads to sustained motivation, clear decision-making and a better understating of the organisation’s aims.

Self-Motivation in Emotional Intelligence

  • Achievement drive: striving to improve or meet a standard of excellence.
  • Commitment: aligning with the goals of the group or organization.
  • Initiative: readiness to act on opportunities.
  • Optimism: persistence in pursuing goals despite obstacles and setbacks.

Empathy

Empathy includes the ability to relate to others and understand how they may feel. Those two things alone are incredibly valuable traits which will not only make you happier and more successful, but also help those around you.

Understanding and reacting to the emotions of other is important. Identifying a certain mood or emotion from a colleague or client and reacting to it can go a long way in developing your relationship.

Strong skills in empathy can help you plan a conversation and a presentation. I used empathy in business and especially in sales. Understanding the emotions of a person that needed my services goes a long way to answering needs and selling what you have.

As a leader empathy can help you lead with compassion and putting yourself in the other person position.

When I trained young cops I used to help them develop this skill by imagining that the person they are dealing with was a friend or relative.

According to Daniel Goleman there are three types of empathy

1. Cognitive Empathy

It’s awareness — understanding someone else’s perspective — which is a crucial part of maintaining a good connection and communication.

2. Social Empathy

 That’s sensing in yourself immediately what the other person is feeling, to have rapport pay full attention to the other person

3. Empathic Concern

If I have someone in my life who’s in distress, I’m not just going to feel it. I’m going to want to help them,” he explains. “It draws on a third part of the brain… We call it the ‘ancient mammalian system for parenting.’ It’s like a parent’s love for a child. If you have that love for someone, you’re going to be there for them.”

Empathy in Emotional Intelligence
  • Empathy: sensing others’ feelings and perspective, and taking an active interest in their concerns.
  • Service orientation: anticipating, recognizing, and meeting customers’ needs.
  • Developing others: sensing what others need in order to develop, and bolstering their abilities.
  • Leveraging diversity: cultivating opportunities through diverse people.
  • Political awareness: reading a group’s emotional currents and power relationships.

Rapport Emotional Intelligence

Social Skills

Rapport building, getting on with people is essential in leadership and makes life fuller in our private lives. Having great social skills is culmination of the 4 emotional intelligence traits I explained above. It’s putting these all together and getting them to work for you socially.

In the workplace social skills oil the cogs of communication. It serves to benefit us by being able to build relationships and connections. Some important social skills include active listening, verbal communication skills, nonverbal communication skills, leadership, and persuasiveness.

Using social skills to win new business is all part of rapport building and enhancing the communication between organization and client.

“friendliness with a purpose”, meaning everyone is treated politely and with respect, yet healthy relationships are then also used for personal and organisational benefit.

Social Skills in Emotional Intelligence
  • Influence: wielding effective tactics for persuasion.
  • Communication: sending clear and convincing messages.
  • Leadership: inspiring and guiding groups and people.
  • Change catalyst: initiating or managing change.
  • Conflict management: negotiating and resolving disagreements.
  • Building bonds: nurturing instrumental relationships.
  • Collaboration and cooperation: working with others toward shared goals.
  • Team capabilities: creating group synergy in pursuing collective goals