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The key to effective delegation

To become an effective and successful leader, one must know the importance of delegation and focus on other areas that make a great difference for the success of the project. A delegation of tasks also helps to manage people effectively in a team. Delegation tasks not only frees a person to focus on their imperative assignments but also helps in the growth and development of other people in the team. When done correctly, it motivates the person to whom the tasks are delegated, which, as a result, contributes to their professional development.

Delegation involves:

  • Clear allocation of assignments and responsibilities.
  • Placing well-defined objectives and measures.
  • Supervising the process, progress, and outcomes.

Here are some of the points that one should keep the following in mind to delegate efficiently.

Prepare

The key to effective delegation is preparing groundwork, which requires careful planning and development of tasks that are being delegated. Designing a clear map of the required tasks will save time and provide clear objectives to the person who will perform those tasks. The purpose here is to be specific and identify responsibilities that need to be assigned, which requires clear communication of the tasks.

Pareto’s Principle 

The Pareto Principle, named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, or The 80/20 Rule, 

Effective managers do not delegate the 20 percent of tasks that affects 80 percent of results, but exactly the opposite. Delegating unimportant tasks such as administrative work that are neither sensitive nor high-risk can be a better option than handing over key tasks. Moreover, these tasks should be delegated based on one’s potential to ensure maximum productivity and effective results.

Challenge and motivate

When deciding whom to delegate certain tasks to, smart managers take many factors into consideration such as individual’s skill sets, nature of the assignment, opportunities for growth, among others. This requires having a good understanding of aptitudes and competencies of the team members.

Clear Explanation

Managers should provide a clear explanation of tasks and responsibility including the expected outcome to ascertain that the person to whom the work is delegated is able to understand the work and is able to complete it in an effective manner.

Take a personal interest in the progress of the delegated task

Managers should provide guidance for the resources that may be required to complete the task. Requesting regular update of tasks and willing to provide assistance, if required, is valuable. However, this should be done without being intrusive, which will give the impression of untrustworthiness to the team member. This can be done by keeping an environment of open communication.

Evaluate and reward

Evaluation of results is more crucial than methods. If the assignments were achieved competently by the team, they should be informed of their success. In case of insufficient performance, the manager should analyse and provide effective feedback.

With practice, the delegation process becomes faster and seamless. As mentioned previously, not only does it help in reducing managers from getting exhausted from work, but it also helps the team to grow together. Moreover, it provides the manager with an opportunity to identify the strengths of their team members.

It also boosts team morale and enthusiasm, enabling them to dive in the challenging projects together. The saying “if you want the job done right, you should do it yourself” is no more applicable in today’s highly competitive and task-oriented era. A better approach is to “delegate effectively if you want a job well done.”

The difference between coaching and mentoring

Often mentoring and coaching are used interchangeably. While they may use similar skillsets to allow clients to reach their full potential, they are not quite the same.

Mentoring traditionally enables an individual to follow in the path of a more experienced colleague who passes on knowledge and helps to open doors to better opportunities. International Mentoring Group suggests mentoring as, “A process of direct transfer of experience and knowledge from one person to another.” Today, the word ‘mentor’ is often thrown around carelessly for anyone who provides a positive, influential guide to another person.

Coaching, on the other hand, does not require a coach to have direct experience of their client’s formal occupational role unless their coaching is specific and skills focused. The Cambridge dictionary defines “coaching” as a “job or activity of providing training for people or helping to prepare them for something”. But this isn’t a complete definition, because coaching is neither training nor preparation, but a framework to achieving goals.

Coaching and online coaching has progressed from having a stigma attached to it to affording status: coaching has become an indication that one’s company considers one worth an investment. Moreover, we think this is because something else has happened in many business cultures – people are more willing to admit to themselves and to others that they need the help of professionals to understand themselves and to grow and develop in their working environment. Senior executives now often acknowledge that they have had coaching and that it has informed them as leaders and influenced their value systems, the way they deal with other people or their approach to their work. This is increasingly seen as something to be proud of, as demonstrating emotional intelligence and insight.

Some of the important differences between coaching and mentoring are as follows:

Aim:

The aim of coaching is to develop potential with a focus on developing and enhancing performance, aimed at specific immediate work-related issues and career transitions. In mentoring, the focus is on the growth of the mentee professionally providing guidance for career development and managing transitions from a broader perspective.

Duration:

The duration of coaching is usually shorter than mentoring. Coaching can be terminated after a few sessions when a specific goal or skill targeted is achieved. Mentoring conversely requires more commitment from both parties and may continue for years.

Drivers:

The driving force behind mentoring is an effort to positively influence the personal and professional growth of the mentee. However, coaching demands defined focus to be present and the aim here is to acquire new skills as efficiently as possible.

Initiative:

Coaching will challenge and encourage rather than direct advice or teach like mentoring, but the individual being coached or mentored will find their answers for themselves. Hence, coaching does not require design, however, mentoring requires strategic models for specific components to be effective.

Focus:

The focus in coaching is task oriented i.e. to focus on certain skills development or address concrete issues. The focus of mentoring is relationship oriented and long term personal goals and growth. It provides a safe environment where the mentee shares the issues that affect their professional and personal success.

Evaluation:

It can be challenging to provide specific key performance indicators for mentoring as it focuses on broader issues. However, coaching has specific goals, therefore, it is easier to measure by tracking the accomplishment of those goals.

The difference here is largely based around goal-setting and focus which is the age-old battle between performance and capability building. The Brefi Group, a UK-based change-management organization, suggests the key difference between mentoring and coaching in this thought-provoking sentence: “A coach has some great questions for your answers; a mentor has some great answers for your questions.”Depending on individuals particular needs and their circumstances, they will guide the process accordingly.

Key Differences

1) In mentoring, the mentor is guiding the mentee through the field they need information in, and the relationship is mentee driven.
2) Mentoring can be used by all levels in an organization; it’s a very broad audience to target a wide group.
3) Mentees often select their own mentor and do so by choosing a mentor with a background that they feel appropriately suites their needs.
4) Mentoring is not a full-time job for most mentors. (However, we recommend creating a role profile and baseline mentoring training to help mentors understand their roles and what is expected of them.)
5) Mentors usually belong to the same organization as the mentee.
6) The costs of mentoring programs are usually lower than coaching programs since the mentor volunteers to support the mentee.

Executive Coaching & Mentoring

There is a great deal of overlap between business and executive coaching or mentoring. The key differences between business and executive coaching and mentoring are that Executive coaches and mentors typically…

  • Have a track record in professional and executive roles
  • Work exclusively with the ‘high-flyers’ or with those who have potential to be a high flyer
  • Work at board or CEO level within high profile or ‘blue-chip’ organisations
  • Offer total confidentiality
  • Work with potential ‘captains of industry’ and high profile business leaders

How a Boss can Foster a More Creative Environment for Their Employees

Creative Workplace, Creative Employees: How Bosses Can Get the Best Ideas from their Workers

It isn’t easy to be competitive and successful in any of today’s cutting-edge professional spheres. Companiesacross the country and the world are working tirelessly to optimize theirproducts, services, and operational styles, and the end result of these effortsis a much greater emphasis on innovative thinking than has been seen in thepast.

Providing reasonable goods and/or services for reasonable prices simply won’tcut it anymore. To excel, companies have to think outside the box andprioritize individuality and creative thinking. And this process begins withbosses. Bosses must create environments wherein creative ideas and thinking areencouraged—not vilified. Only then can their companies perform at their bestand bring about positive industry-wide change.

To help bosses, employees, and companies be as successful as possible, let’stake a look at some practical tips bosses can implement to encourage creativityand get the best ideas from their workers.

Be Positive

Positivity is an important ingredient in the recipe for creative success.Bosses who are negative, whether in their moods, actions, behaviors, or words,are almost certain to cultivate negativity in employees. Furthermore, anequally concerning byproduct of negativity on the part of bosses is inhibitedcreativity. The reasoning is simple:if employees need to worry about being cut down or demeaned for suggesting afresh and creative idea, they’ll probably avoid suggesting ideas altogether.(Or they will limit their doing so to obvious and relatively insignificantmatters.)

Positive bosses contribute to positive workplaces, and positive workplaces contribute to comfortable employees and enhanced creativity.

Utilize Teambuilding Exercises

Another key component of workplace creativity and innovation is comfort amongstemployees. Just as bosses’negativity and careless feedback can dissuade employees from making creativecontributions to projects, so too can discouraging remarks made by fellowemployees. More than this, though, creativity can be limited if coworkers don’tfeel comfortable and open around one another. The awkward air of “feelingout” that most strangers encounter when meeting for the first time candevastate workplaces.

Teambuildingexercises work to prevent all these things, and they bolster creativity andfun in the process.

Implement a Creative Website Design

Creative finance website designscan encourage creative ideas from employees. Nearly all facets of today’sculture are driven or impacted by tech, and business isn’t an exception. Acompany’s website design serves as its connection to the outside world—as itsrepresentation to family and friends, competing businesses and organizations,and potential clients and partners. By making a creative and welcoming company website, a boss can contributeto a workplace that’s creative andwelcoming; in the process, he or she can also inspire employees to live up tothe image set forth by this website.

These tips are sure to help bosses foster more creative environments for theiremployees. As was said, creativity is a must for today’s businesses andorganizations. Another upside of creativity, however, besides the fact that itbrings with it success and quantifiable results, is that it helps coworkers tofeel more like family members. This might sound cheesy, but given thatemployees have to spend a sizable portion of each day together throughout themajority of the year, comfort and good feelings benefit all; there’s no sensein making work more difficult than it needs to be.Thanks for reading, and here’s to smart and creative businesses!

The 5 Essential Components of Emotional Intelligence That Will Help You Achieve

Emotional Intelligence is how somebody manages their personality to be both personally and interpersonally effective. It’s their ability to identify, assess and control one’s own emotions, the emotion of others and that of groups

It’s the difference between a leader or a manager a people person or a task driven person. My experience shows that when you lack this essential skill you can demotivate and can be less effective at what you do.

People with a high degree of emotional intelligence know what they’re feeling, what their emotions mean, and how these emotions can affect other people.

According to Daniel Goleman, an American psychologist who helped to popularize emotional intelligence, there are five key elements to it

  • Self-awareness.
  • Self-regulation.
  •  Motivation.
  • Empathy.
  • Social skills.

Daniel Goleman’s 1995 book ‘Emotional Intelligence’ introduced a whole new perspective on predicting and analysing employee performance. The author, one of the world’s leading EQ academics, suggested that there is far more to being successful than high levels of cognitive intelligence.

Goleman suggested ‘emotional intelligence’, a term developed by Salovey and Mayer (1989), is twice as important as cognitive intelligence for predicting career success and there was currently far too much emphasis on traditional predictors of employee performance.

High levels of emotional intelligence improve working relationships, help to develop problem solving skills, increase efficiency and effectiveness and catalyse the development of new strategies.

Goleman defines it as “the ability to identify, assess and control one’s own emotions, the emotion of others and that of groups.”

The Facts Regarding Emotional Intelligence

Neurological evidence shows that thoughts and feelings do not occur randomly. They are responses to a stimulus which has been perceived, interpreted and filtered through one’s underlying attitudes. It is a person’s attitude that largely influences their feelings, thoughts and in turn behaviours. Consequently, Emotional Intelligence is fundamentally influenced by the attitudes you 

Five Key Components to Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence article

1.Self-Awareness

Practically this means recognizing you’re the changes of emotional state. When for example a person says something to you that really annoys you. Emotional intelligence people will be aware that for example their heart is pumping faster. That feeling in the pit of there stomach is there and finally that they now select how they react to the situation. Importantly for me is the fact that those rich in Emotional Intelligence choose how they react, they are under full control.

As a young police officer and later in business self-awareness allowed me to adopt a different attitude to everyday and extreme situation helping to result in positive outcomes.

Self-awareness has huge benefits, including the ability to notice problems arise so that you can handle them swiftly– before they get bigger– to the ability to see things from a clearer perspective, making your response to emotions healthier.

Individuals with high levels of emotional intelligence our comfortable with there own thoughts and emotions and understand how they impact on others. Understanding and accepting the way you feel is often the first step to overcoming.

People who possess good self-awareness tend to confident in themselves and their abilities, and are aware of how other people perceive them.

Self-awareness in Emotional Intelligence
  • Emotional awareness: recognizing one’s emotions and their effects.
  • Accurate self-assessment: knowing one’s strengths and limits.
  • Self-confidence: sureness about one’s self-worth and capabilities.

Self-regulation

Self-regulation is all about expressing your emotions appropriately. It is also important to be able to control and manage your impulses and emotions. Strong self-regulation skills are high in conscientiousness high in EI means that you will thoughtful of how you influence others and take responsibility for your own actions.

Slamming the phone down and cursing in front of your team for example shows lack of self-regulation and that you have failed to recognise the effect of your behaviour on your team.

Acting rashly or without caution can lead to mistakes being made and can often damage relationships with clients or colleagues?

Its important to note that managing your emotions is not about bottling things up. This will only lead to a huge outburst or stress as you’re feeling mount up. Self-regulation requires that simply means waiting for the right time, place, and avenue to express your emotions.

Those who are skilled in self-regulation tend to be flexible and adapt well to change. They are also good at managing conflict and diffusing tense or difficult situations.

Goleman also suggests that those with strong self-regulation skills are high in conscientiousness. They are thoughtful of how they influence others and take responsibility for their own actions.

Self Control in Emotional Intelligence
  • Self-control: managing disruptive emotions and impulses.
  • Trustworthiness: maintaining standards of honesty and integrity.
  • Conscientiousness: taking responsibility for personal performance.
  • Adaptability: flexibility in handling change.
  • Innovativeness: being comfortable with and open to novel ideas and new information

Emotional Intelligence Motivation

Self-Motivation

We all react well to positive people with a passion and its no exception when it comes to leadership. Having motivation as a leader means that you are probably responding to a vision or gaol. Emotional intelligent people passion for work will go beyond money or status. In their hearts they may want to create a better world or impact on individuals so that they better themselves.

I see these traits in people I coach they possess a strong desire to achieve and to optimise their performance. People who have these motivational skills can face failure by bouncing back and finding a new and better way to proceed. People with this sort of mental ability tend to be resilient and make great leaders.

A passion for what you do is far better for your emotional intelligence. This leads to sustained motivation, clear decision-making and a better understating of the organisation’s aims.

Self-Motivation in Emotional Intelligence

  • Achievement drive: striving to improve or meet a standard of excellence.
  • Commitment: aligning with the goals of the group or organization.
  • Initiative: readiness to act on opportunities.
  • Optimism: persistence in pursuing goals despite obstacles and setbacks.

Empathy

Empathy includes the ability to relate to others and understand how they may feel. Those two things alone are incredibly valuable traits which will not only make you happier and more successful, but also help those around you.

Understanding and reacting to the emotions of other is important. Identifying a certain mood or emotion from a colleague or client and reacting to it can go a long way in developing your relationship.

Strong skills in empathy can help you plan a conversation and a presentation. I used empathy in business and especially in sales. Understanding the emotions of a person that needed my services goes a long way to answering needs and selling what you have.

As a leader empathy can help you lead with compassion and putting yourself in the other person position.

When I trained young cops I used to help them develop this skill by imagining that the person they are dealing with was a friend or relative.

According to Daniel Goleman there are three types of empathy

1. Cognitive Empathy

It’s awareness — understanding someone else’s perspective — which is a crucial part of maintaining a good connection and communication.

2. Social Empathy

 That’s sensing in yourself immediately what the other person is feeling, to have rapport pay full attention to the other person

3. Empathic Concern

If I have someone in my life who’s in distress, I’m not just going to feel it. I’m going to want to help them,” he explains. “It draws on a third part of the brain… We call it the ‘ancient mammalian system for parenting.’ It’s like a parent’s love for a child. If you have that love for someone, you’re going to be there for them.”

Empathy in Emotional Intelligence
  • Empathy: sensing others’ feelings and perspective, and taking an active interest in their concerns.
  • Service orientation: anticipating, recognizing, and meeting customers’ needs.
  • Developing others: sensing what others need in order to develop, and bolstering their abilities.
  • Leveraging diversity: cultivating opportunities through diverse people.
  • Political awareness: reading a group’s emotional currents and power relationships.

Rapport Emotional Intelligence

Social Skills

Rapport building, getting on with people is essential in leadership and makes life fuller in our private lives. Having great social skills is culmination of the 4 emotional intelligence traits I explained above. It’s putting these all together and getting them to work for you socially.

In the workplace social skills oil the cogs of communication. It serves to benefit us by being able to build relationships and connections. Some important social skills include active listening, verbal communication skills, nonverbal communication skills, leadership, and persuasiveness.

Using social skills to win new business is all part of rapport building and enhancing the communication between organization and client.

“friendliness with a purpose”, meaning everyone is treated politely and with respect, yet healthy relationships are then also used for personal and organisational benefit.

Social Skills in Emotional Intelligence
  • Influence: wielding effective tactics for persuasion.
  • Communication: sending clear and convincing messages.
  • Leadership: inspiring and guiding groups and people.
  • Change catalyst: initiating or managing change.
  • Conflict management: negotiating and resolving disagreements.
  • Building bonds: nurturing instrumental relationships.
  • Collaboration and cooperation: working with others toward shared goals.
  • Team capabilities: creating group synergy in pursuing collective goals

Do you have a bad boss?

Bad bosses are detrimental to our enjoyment at work and to the business’s they work in. They demotivate people and cause businesses to rack up huge costs as people leave or simply don’t give their best.

 A study by Life Meets Work found that 56% of American workers claim their boss is mildly or highly toxic. A study by the American Psychological Association found that 75% of Americans say their “boss is the most stressful part of their workday.”

Work time should be precious it’s where we can spend most of our time and where we can experience some great highs. Bad bosses are missing out on opportunities to maximise revenue and making a positive impact on our lives. I list 10 signs of a bad boss

1. Lacks Emotional Control

Angry bosses and the ones that are moody one day and happy the next provide employees with an emotional roller coaster.

They don’t realise that they are setting the tone of the day influencing the mood that people can take home with them. Angry bosses have little self-control or awareness of themselves and lack emotional intelligence

It’s bad for them and its bad for you, repeated activation of the stress response takes a toll on the body. Research suggests that chronic stress contributes to high blood pressure, promotes the formation of artery-clogging deposits, and causes brain changes that may contribute to anxiety, depression, and addiction. Recommended Read Daniel Goldman Moods Matter (non promotional)

2. Does Not Know Who You Are

Those that lead can win trust and respect when they genuinely become interested in who they work with. Learning about someone’s life and what motivates them are all key to increasing performance. No one wants to be invisible and feel that they are just another number. Bad bosses don’t engage they lock themselves away almost afraid to speak to their people. What have they got to hide?

3. Does Not Really Understand Your Expertise

It’s a fact that a boss may not understand the detail of the role that you undertake. You are the subject expert and a boss that does not appreciate your point of view and experience is missing out on vital information. Some think they have to demonstrate to their subordinates they possess better knowledge than them in a weird desire to feel superior. A boss who thinks they are experts in everything really winds people up. They are missing out on learning for themselves, will make the wrong decision based on a lack of understanding. We all hate a ‘know it all’ and when it comes to a boss there is no exception.

4. No Flexibility At Work

Is your boss a leader or a manager, bad bosses manage people bean counting and tied up with micro managing detail. They are not a leaders you can identify them by inflexibility. They will refuse to take account that we all have lives outside of work. So when you have a problem that’s stressing you out and your time off is refused it really does get to you. It will be the thing you remember and recall to others. Importantly it serve to change the mindset of a motivated individual. Bad bosses will ignore the fact you may work in your own time or arrive early tied up with the rules.

A great boss is a human being that can offer to help you out and will win your loyalty. They will encourage you to take time away from your computer when you have lunch. They will will want you to take the time off you are entitled too. Bad bosses don’t realise that we all need time off for recuperation and we all need a degree of flexibility for the emergencies that happen in all of our lives.

5. No Positive Feedback

Some bosses only look out for the bad stuff and only highlight your performance when things go wrong. This breeds a culture where everyone is afraid of making a mistake. Naturally that organization will lack innovation and creativity which all have elements of risk.

What about the other times that you did well? Negative Bias bosses suck the enthusiasm out of a team and individuals. Good feedback inspires and helps create the feeling of being appreciated. Some bosses are scared to praise as they think the person will stop working hard? Bad bosses can’t say thanks and its destroying motivation. Bad bosses won’t thank you for great performance as they will feel its your job. Some may just provide a perk or agree to a salary increase not knowing that words from the boss can be just as powerful.

6. Favouritism

Office politics and a boss that plays one person against another is a horrible game. One played by thick skinned bosses who don’t realise what they are doing. You may even come across bosses that use it as a deliberate tactic. Divide and conquer style bosses make life really difficulty and give us feelings of injustice. Favouritism is not against the law but it’s frustrating for everyone, even the one that’s been picked as the favourite! Individuals feel helpless and hard done by and will have a heightened sense of awareness around the people who are the chosen ones.

7.Takes The Glory For Your Hard Work

Bad bosses don’t even realize they are taking all the glory for a job well done. Some see it as they employed you to do the job, which you did well, and so they rightfully have the right to congratulate themselves. How many bosses have gained promotion, been rewarded financially for the hard work of others?

Bad bosses don’t recognize the contribution you have made. When they are basking in the glory it would be so easy to mention your name or dept., it would be so easy to thank you for your contribution. Bad bosses who have zero empathy, they cant see that the next time you may not try so hard. They can turn a star performer into a former employee with no idea on how demotivating this type behaviour can be.

8. Does Not Bother To Explain the ‘Why’

In the past it was good to enough to say “Just do it” without an explanation to why. An entire generation including my own simply followed the orders of the boss, sometimes we were perplexed to the meaning of the task. Asking why it was necessary would be seen as to question authority almost disrespectful. Bad bosses continue with this dinosaur rhetoric replying “Because I said so! This will leave the enquiring mind of the new generations offended demotivated and sometimes lost. Knowing the why can help put you in the bigger picture, motivate you to do a great job and help you feel part of the business.

After-all you may have a suggestion that could really help. Bad bosses will not realise that others are motivated differently and may think differently about there roles.

9. Does Not Recognise Our Need to Grow

Bad bosses are not interested in your personal goal to develop, in fact ambition could be seen as a negative attribute, they see that you may looking to leave or outgrow your existing role. Spending company money on developing an individual is seen by the bad boss as fruitless exercise. They may even see it as threatening as you strive to better yourself with up to date knowledge and qualifications. Good bosses will see that the individual will be in a position to bring new knowledge to the business and have an inspired individual who seeks personal growth

10. Lacks Passion and Vision

People love to follow someone who has a passion and a great vision for the future, they want to feel they are making a difference. Bad bosses will overlook the need to inspire and to motivate. They will see that you are receiving a salary or bonus and that should be enough. Bad bosses are more about carrot and stick and NOT follow me and my dream.

 So What Have I Missed?

Has any of the above resonated with you? I am interested in your experiences it would be great to have some added below (without names of course)

Who is this guy Nick Marr?

 I started my life helping leaders get the best from themselves at the Metropolitan Police Leadership Academy, Scotland Yard. I then went on to run several disruptive businesses; I was featured in the FT and BBC Breakfast for my startups. I accidentally created a social media viral that went global. I have experience as Vice President of Sales and Chief Marketing Officer. 

I coach leaders, help individuals with their startups and speak at events about leadership and diversity.

More at NickMarr.com it would be great to hear from you.

#leadership #leadeshipskills #boss #people #hr #leadershipdevelopment # 

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